Friday, Aug. 22, 2014

Book review: 'Does this Insecurity Make Me Look Fat?' is a positive pep talk for Mormon women

By Brooke Porter, For the Deseret News

Published: Sat, Jan. 25 5:00 a.m. MST

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"Does this Insecurity Make Me Look Fat?" is by Michelle Wilson.

(Deseret Book)

"DOES THIS INSECURITY MAKE ME LOOK FAT?" by Michelle Wilson, Deseret Book, $15.99, 165 pages (nf)

Like most women, author Michelle Wilson has struggled with self-deprecating thoughts, feelings of discouragement, envy or fear and provides applicable solutions through anecdotes in her latest book, "Does this Insecurity Make Me Look Fat?"

With a book title as creative as this, it's hard not to pick it up and fall in love. The mother of three has a down-to-earth style of writing, allowing readers into her personal world that started with failures and setbacks — like not even graduating from high school. (Though later she earned her GED.)

Wilson splits the book into two parts: "Learn to See" and "Choose to Be." The first half is an attempt to alter readers' views of themselves. "This is our great quest: to change our perspective, to try and see life — and ourselves — through God's eyes. Only then can we begin to see our worth. Only then can we go to work lifting and building others — doing his work."

She capitalizes and refers to it as "the Perspective," (along with Choice and If), reminding women that God's perspective is what should be sought and is truly all that matters. Part 1 addresses guilt, shame, envy, fear, approval of others, irrational comparisons and shame, and how to work through them.

Wilson — a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Saints and returned missionary — takes readers on a roller coaster of emotions as her relatable stories of raising children and interacting with women invoke tears as well as laughs. She also uses the scriptures in a way that empowers women and encourages optimism.

The second portion provides unique insight, like how "the If" enables the power to choose. "Within its two little letters, important principles such as accountability, responsibility, possibility, and the power to choose can be found. … So many wonderful things may be ours — if we choose them."

LDS women are sure to feel uplifted, validated and encouraged after reading this pep-talk book. It's an easy read and invites personal reflection and change. It's suitable for teenager girls as well as adult women.

If you go ...

What: Michelle Wilson book signing

When: Friday, Jan. 31, 6:30-8 p.m.

Where: Deseret Book, Orem Parkway, 230 E. University Parkway, Orem

Also ...

When: Saturday, Feb. 1, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.

Where: Deseret Book, Salt Lake Downtown, 45 W. South Temple, Salt Lake City

Web: www.deseretbook.com

Brooke Porter is a California native turned Oklahoma adoptee. She writes, edits and is a full-time wife to a busy pediatric resident. Join her worrisome scenarios and solutions: atleastitsnotasingle.blogspot.com. EMAIL: bporter@deseretdigital.com

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1. Gildas
LOGAN, UT,
Jan. 25, 2014

Hope the book does some good. It's hard for people to reverse large weight gains once things get so far out of control. However I have seen quite a few who have turned the corner and lost a great amount of surplus weight fairly quickly too. Often it is when they are facing serious related illnesses and early death.

2. Lilalips
Attleboro, MA,
Jan. 26, 2014

But its not about weight really is it? It's about how we see ourselves in comparison to God's love for us. The whole entire point of the book is that IF we see ourselves as God sees us then we DON'T have that nagging insecurity that comes from comparing ourselves to other people. Most people don't even realize that they are subtly comparing themselves to others. OR judging others, (which is a form of comparison), in the back of their minds all the time. Comparing outcomes in terms of choices is fine. Comparing worth or value is not.