Friday, Aug. 22, 2014

How to raise a caring, moral child: Parents want to but aren't sure how

Recommended by Alison Moore, Deseret News

Published: Mon, April 14 11:25 p.m. MDT

 While many parents hope to raise caring children, they often don't know how.

While many parents hope to raise caring children, they often don't know how.

(Getty Images/Fuse)

A recent opinion piece from The New York Times shared research and analysis on raising moral children.

"Surveys reveal that in the United States, parents from European, Asian, Hispanic and African ethnic groups all place far greater importance on caring than achievement," Adam Grant wrote in the article. "These patterns hold around the world: When people in 50 countries were asked to report their guiding principles in life, the value that mattered most was not achievement, but caring."

Grant added that while many parents hope to raise caring children, they often don't know how. The article cites research that focuses on where morality comes from and how it can be taught to children in a way that lasts.

Read the entire article at The New York Times.

Alison Moore is a writer for the Faith and Family sections at DeseretNews.com. She is studying journalism and editing at Brigham Young University.

Email: amoore@deseretdigital.com Twitter: @alison_kathleen

Recommended
1. cjb
Bountiful, UT,
April 14, 2014

‘How to raise a caring, moral child: Parents want to but aren't sure how’

+++

Step number 1: Choose the right parents. {much of what we are is in the genes)

Step number 2: Choose the right spouse. {good genes and willing to set good example)

Step number 3: Set a good example.

2. Hutterite
American Fork, UT,
April 15, 2014

First of all, religion has nothing to do with it. In fact, if you raise your kids to call out nonsense when they see it, they may well abandon religion entirely. That's OK, you've done your job. As for how to raise a caring, moral child...you first. Be caring and faithful to your spouse in good times and bad. Life long commitment is now rare. Honour your commitments. Be at peace with yourself and know who you are. Respect yourself. Respect everyone else. Own your life. Never try to abuse or deprive someone unfairly. Be the person your children should be. Pay taxes proudly. Earn your right to society. We can do this. Our kids will benefit.

3. Jamescmeyer
Midwest City, USA, OK,
April 15, 2014

Raising a caring, moral child is most easily achieved and likely to occur in a gospel-centered home with a loving father and mother.

Addendum: Raising a reliably moral child requires not trying to rationalize that moral things, such as properly lived religion, aren't neccessary. It's like trying to figure out how to avoid falling off a cliff by seeing how close to the edge you can balance instead of just staying away from the cliff.

4. jeanie
orem, UT,
April 15, 2014

"if you raise your kids to call out nonsense when they see it, they may well abandon religion entirely. " - or they may embrace it more fully as it can give a clear context as to why morality matters. Both are options.

Respecting others includes being judicious about using the word "nonsense" when dealing with others who have deeply held beliefs.
We can express our beliefs while remining courteous. This is a great example for our kids to see we can have different beliefs, even strong ones, and champion those beliefs while treating others respectfully. How much better this world would be! This goes for the religious as well as for those who are not.

5. Furry1993
Ogden, UT,
April 15, 2014

We let our children make decisions, within proper limits, from the time they were tiny. We taught them that along with the right to make decisions comes the fact that a person has to take responsibility for the consequences of the decisions s/he makes. They started out with a small area in which they could make decisions (example -- what to wear to school) and, as they grew older, the area in which they could make decisions grew larger as they became more mature. If they wanted to make a decision that was outsisde the area in which they were allowed to make decisions, they had to "argue" us for the right to do so -- present logical, rational reasons for their wish to decide and if they could sustain their argument then they gained the right to make the decision. By the time they reached adulthood, they were practiced and experienced decision-makers and were caring and moral people.

Make the children accountable for what they do.