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Saturday, Oct. 25, 2014

Picturing history: Rock Creek Hollow

By Kenneth Mays, For the Deseret News

Published: Wed, Aug. 6 10:14 a.m. MDT

 Rock Creek Hollow in Wyoming is one of the historic places associated with the 1856 handcart company led by James Willie. It was there that those pioneers rested after traveling through a blizzard over Rocky Ridge, one of the highest points on the trail to the Salt Lake Valley. After fighting the extreme conditions for up to 30 hours, a number of the Saints in the company, perhaps as many as 13, died and were buried here.

Rock Creek Hollow in Wyoming is one of the historic places associated with the 1856 handcart company led by James Willie. It was there that those pioneers rested after traveling through a blizzard over Rocky Ridge, one of the highest points on the trail to the Salt Lake Valley. After fighting the extreme conditions for up to 30 hours, a number of the Saints in the company, perhaps as many as 13, died and were buried here.

(Kenneth Mays)

Rock Creek Hollow in rugged Wyoming is one of the historic places associated with the 1856 handcart company led by James Willie. It was there that those pioneers rested after traveling through a blizzard over Rocky Ridge, one of the highest points on the trail to the Salt Lake Valley. After fighting the extreme conditions for up to 30 hours, a number of the Saints in the company, perhaps as many as 13, died and were buried here.

The site was acquired over a long period of time largely through the leadership and inspiration of Robert Scott Lorimer, former president of the Riverton Wyoming Stake. President Lorimer's efforts were approved and encouraged by President Gordon B. Hinckley, then president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. President Hinckley considered Rock Creek to be sacred ground and was known to have been overcome with emotion at this and other sites in the area.

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