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Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014

10 horses in Magna died of dehydration, police confirm

Published: Wed, Aug. 13 1:10 p.m. MDT

 Investigators have now confirmed that 10 horses found dead last month in a field near 9200 West and 3500 South died of dehydration.

Investigators have now confirmed that 10 horses found dead last month in a field near 9200 West and 3500 South died of dehydration.

(Shutterstock)

MAGNA — Investigators have now confirmed that 10 horses found dead last month in a field near 9200 West and 3500 South died of dehydration.

With that confirmation, the Unified Police Department announced in a prepared statement Wednesday that it will be "screening criminal charges against the horse’s owner later this week with the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office for animal cruelty."

On July 18, police were called to the area near the Pleasant Green Cemetery after a resident found the bodies of several horses. A total of 10 deceased horses were discovered following an extensive search of the area. One horse was found alive.

The Utah Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory determined the causes of death on all the horses to be dehydration.

The horse that was found alive has since been upgraded to good condition following treatment, Hoyal said.

He noted that the horses' owner has been cooperating with authorities in their investigation.

— Pat Reavy

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1. BU52
Provo, ut,
Aug. 14, 2014

Pretty mean to keep a bunch of animals locked up and not give them the basics to live.

2. Lolly
Lehi, UT,
Aug. 14, 2014

When my Uncle's 5 cows slipped through an open gate and wandered onto the railroad tracks and were hit by a freight train, the neighbor's and authorities had compassion for him and his wife in their loss. Their financial loss was great and my Uncle always remembered. Recently when a child was left in the heat of a car, it was deemed an accident and compassion and love were expressed by nearly everyone. Now, these horses which represent a large amount of financial loss require charges to be filed. The DN had nothing about the owner or the owner's feelings. It would appear that the loss of ten horses are more of a concern to law enforcement then the death of a child. As in the other case, understanding the circumstances, from the owner's standpoint, are important and authorities rushing in to file charges do not impress me nor do the personal and taxpayer costs involved. If the horses were purposely abused then there would be an issue to be dealt with. Compassion for the family of the child should also prevail in the tragic deaths of these horses and the family who owned them.