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Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

Third-grade teacher surprised to learn classroom has 4 sets of twins

By Mary Richards, Deseret News

Published: Tue, Sept. 2 11:40 a.m. MDT

 Third-grade teacher Andrea Wood has a unique class this year at Columbia Elementary School in Kaysville: four sets of twins make up one-third of the class. They include (pictured standing, from left to right) Bennet and Aiden Campbell, Logan and Gracie Sundloff, Sara and Alyssa Norton, and (kneeling) Brighton and Brendan Pierce.

Third-grade teacher Andrea Wood has a unique class this year at Columbia Elementary School in Kaysville: four sets of twins make up one-third of the class. They include (pictured standing, from left to right) Bennet and Aiden Campbell, Logan and Gracie Sundloff, Sara and Alyssa Norton, and (kneeling) Brighton and Brendan Pierce.

(Mary Richards, KSL NewsRadio)

KAYSVILLE — For a teacher, getting to know all of your students at the start of the school year can take a while.

For Andrea Wood, a third-grade teacher at Columbia Elementary School, that task may be a bit tougher this year. That's because she has four sets of twins in her classroom.

“Getting to know them has been really fun; they're just really great kids," Wood said. "It's exciting, and I think they're excited about it, too.”

Bennet and Aiden Campbell are the only set of identical twins in the class; Logan and Gracie Sundloff, Sara and Alyssa Norton, and Brighton and Brendan Pierce are all fraternal twins.

Wood said she was surprised when she learned about the dynamics of her new class, but says they might make some things easier.

“When it comes to parent-teacher conference time, I’ll have one parent to talk to (for each set of twins)," she said. "And I think for parents, it might be easier to have just one set of teacher rules and other things to get used to.”

As for the twins, they all like being in the same class as their sibling; and Wood has no plans to change that.

“I have twins in my family — my sister has identical twins — and I also have a really good friend (who's) a twin. … And they say, 'Don’t split them up,'" she said.

Still, separation from one another inside the classroom might be a different story. While Wood has the siblings sitting next to each another as the class gets to know one another, she said they'll probably be separated eventually.

Down the hall, another class is dealing with a similar situation, albeit on a much smaller scale. There is a fifth set of twins, another identical pair, in Columbia Elementary's third-grade class.

Email: mrichards@deseretnews.com

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