Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Industries with the largest job openings in Utah (35 items)

By , Deseret News

March 19, 2014

The Utah Department of Workforce Services recently released a list of the jobs with the most openings in Utah on the state government's official website, Utah.gov.

Here, we've listed only the top 35 jobs with the most openings in the state.

Based on data from the Occupational Outlook handbook at the Bureau of Labor Statistics, we have also provided some additional relevant information for each job description.

1 of 35. Industrial Engineers

There are 186 openings for this position.

The median pay in 2012 was $78,860 per year.

Necessary entry-level education is a bachelor's degree.

2 of 35. Accountants and Auditors

There are 204 openings for this position.

The median pay in 2012 was $63,550 per year.

Necessary entry-level education is a bachelor's degree.

3 of 35. General and Operations Manager

There are 206 openings for this position.

The median pay in 2012 was $82,790 per year.

Necessary entry-level education is a bachelor's degree.

4 of 35. Construction Laborers

There are 210 openings for this position.

The median pay in 2012 was $29,160 per year.

Though no entry-level education is necessary, training programs are required.

5 of 35. Forest and Conservation Technicians

There are 218 openings for this position.

The median pay in 2012 was $33,920 per year.

Necessary entry-level education is an associate degree.
1. I know it. I Live it. I Love it.
Provo, UT,
March 20, 2014

Regarding management...

1) Degrees matter or at least having equivalent skills
2) Working hard is a plus
3) Being an optimist AND likable is key

These things are common, but there is always one thing that misses the mark... knowing how to listen to employees, filter out useful feedback from useless feedback correctly (less than common, imo), work in a team, manage people responsibly but positively, etc.

Degrees have a little less weight in my book. Anyone can learn to work hard, get good grades, and supposedly "know a trade". But actually knowing how to manage in a productive and positive way is far more important. It affects the bottom line, company morale, and having employees that are willing to be motivated. It motivates employees far more than financial incentives, food, etc. Most incentives don't work. Liking both your boss AND your job are far more effective. Don't think it's possible to like both? Then you are part of the problem, not the solution.

The fact that so many companies still struggle with this just astounds me sometimes. It's not rocket science.

2. Jamescmeyer
Midwest City, USA, OK,
March 20, 2014

Network and Computer Systems Administrators... Computer Software Engineers... First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Office... Could you keep these things on the list for a couple more years? That'd be awesome.

I'd take Computer Support Specialist, but it's not a primary pick. "Your computer is 'slow', huh? Is there maybe something more specific you could describe?"

3. BYR
West Bountiful, UT,
March 20, 2014

I noticed how those who take care of us, clean up after us, doing the menial work are the least paid. They shouldn't be. Without them, we would be wallowing in our own waste.

4. CaptScooby
San Antonio, TX,
March 20, 2014

I'm not sure what's going on here, but as a veteran, that should be more than enough to know what's going on and how to manage anyone or anything. Just because someone can use fancy words doesn't make anyone else less able to do the job. Using fancy language can actually hinder the performance of the job itself. Keep it simple

5. Ellzington
Provo, UT,
March 20, 2014

It is cheap to hire someone for menial work because people who can do the work are plentiful.
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