Wednesday, July 23, 2014

A haunting past: A photographic look at some of Utah's ghost towns (55 items)

By Deseret News

March 20, 2014

Throughout Utah's history, towns were settled, developed and grew. With the depletion of minerals, changing economic times, disaster and drought, however, some of these same towns were soon abandoned and left to the dust of time.

Here's a photographic look at some of Utah's many ghost towns.

1 of 55. Eagle City, Utah

This photo shows a cabin at the site of Eagle City in the Henry Mountains, Utah. Eagle City was a small mining camp in the 1880s for the Bromide Basin mining area. It was abandoned by 1900.

2 of 55. Eagle City, Utah

This photo shows a mining camp in the Henry Mountains in Wayne County where Jack Sumner discovered gold bromide in the 1870s and Eagle City was established in the 1880s. It was abandoned by 1900.

3 of 55. Eagle City, Utah

This photo shows a spring in the Bromide Gulch in the foothills of the Henry Mountains. Eagle City was a small mining camp in the 1880s for the Bromide Basin mining area. It was abandoned by 1900 and is now a ghost town.

4 of 55. Frisco, Utah

These iconic beehive kilns are in the ghost town of Frisco.

5 of 55. Giles, Utah

This photo shows an old roadhouse built by a Mr. Abbott in the town of Giles, a farming community that gave way to relentless droughts.
1. Overjoyed
Orem, UT,
March 21, 2014

I enjoyed looking at the pictures of Utah ghost towns, but found it difficult, even annoying that I had to click through 55 pages at one picture per page, all of different sizes, in order to see them, especially when so many were from the same towns. They could easily have been grouped together for viewer convenience.

2. Reday
WVC, UT,
March 21, 2014

Love ghost towns & pictures; would like to see more location information; Iron Town is West, not East of Cedar City.

3. Nan BW
ELder, CO,
March 21, 2014

I love ghost towns, and have visited many in Utah. However, I didn't find this list to be very exciting. As Overjoyed stated, there is no grouping of the photos, and some sites have too many photos for the places, particularly Ironton. I think that any real "ghost town chaser" could have done a better job with organizing and capturing a wider variety of abandoned towns or hamlets.

4. Eliyahu
Pleasant Grove, UT,
March 22, 2014

Slideshows might have made sense when everyone had dial-up, but modern ISP connections make it easy to load all of the photos on a single page where we can scroll through them without endless clicking.

5. Serenity
Manti, UT,
March 22, 2014

I agree with the above criticisms of having to click through all those pictures but it was interesting to see these photos. We've seen many of these ghost towns, so its interesting to have some sort of captions about them. Thank you