Monday, July 28, 2014

The most charitable states in America (25 items)

Bethan Owen

May 18, 2014

A recent Gallup poll has ranked each U.S. state by its charitable giving, listing Utah, Minnesota, and Hawaii as the most generous states.

A minimum of 600 citizens per state were asked whether they had personally donated money to charity, spent time volunteering with an organization, or both over the past month. All 50 states were polled between June and December of 2013.

In previous studies, Gallup has found a positive correlation between charitable giving and the well-being of a state ( well-being defined by Gallup primarily by economic and health related factors). This poll seems to confirm their previous findings, as all of the most charitable states are above the national average for well-being.

All information on our list comes from Gallup polls, with the exception of median state income, which was found in the most recent government census.

1 of 25. Colorado

64 percent donated money

41 percent donated time

32 percent said yes to both

Most prominent religion: Protestant

35 percent “very religious”

39 percent “non religious”

Median income: $60,180 annually

2 of 25. Oklahoma

60 percent donated money

42 percent donated time

33 percent said yes to both

Most prominent religion: Protestant

49 percent “very religious”

20 percent “non religious”

Median income: $47,755 annually

3 of 25. Alabama

63 percent donated money

44 percent donated time

33 percent said yes to both

Most prominent religion: Protestant

52 percent “very religious”

18 percent “non religious”

Median income: $43,350 annually

4 of 25. Nebraska

62 percent donated money

46 percent donated time

33 percent said yes to both

Most prominent religion: Protestant

47 percent “very religious”

25 percent “non religious”

Median income: $54,755 annually

5 of 25. Maryland

68 percent donated money

41 percent donated time

33 percent said yes to both

Most prominent religion: Protestant

39 percent “very religious”

32 percent “non religious”

Median income: $69,920 annually
1. samhill
Salt Lake City, UT,
May 19, 2014

I've been taking note of these studies for about 20 years. Every last one shows a strong correlation between the religiosity of an area and various forms of "charity".

It led to the obvious question of why areas that are famous for their liberal politics (California, New York, etc.) were so consistently stingy, relatively speaking, when it comes actual acts of charity. Then, about 7-8 years ago, I was watching "The View" when the topic of conversation turned to the results of a study showing the same correspondence between charitable behavior and "conservative" (meaning, religious) values.

They all offered their opinions but it was the obsessively expressive and zealously liberal Joy Behar who provided the best insight into why liberals, in general, appear less charitable. Her comment was that she didn't do volunteer work or donate to charities because she relied on the government to provide "charity" and thus paying her taxes were her acts of charity, which weren't counted in the study.

Question answered! To someone of her mindset paying a mandatory tax, taken through coercion, is equivalent to someone freely choosing to give time/money....AND pay mandatory taxes.

No wonder she favors the compulsion of Obamacare.

2. DN Subscriber
Cottonwood Heights, UT,
May 19, 2014

Thank you to everyone who makes charitable contributions, be they a few dollars, or hundreds of millions of dollars. And, just as important (or perhaps more so) are the people who volunteer their time for good deeds. All Utahns can be proud of this well deserved honor.

It is important to note that charitable contributions are made voluntarily, and usually used very efficiently with minimum overhead expenses or diversion of funds to pay layers of bureaucracy, and thus provide maximum benefit to recipients.

The same cannot be said for government "good deeds" which confiscate earnings under threat of law, waste much of the money paying hordes of bureaucrats with little interest in the outcomes, and fund programs directed by politicians who often are motivated more for political advantage than truly helping those in need.

Utahns can be proud to be a role model for all citizens, both givers, recipients and those who claim to care.

3. Big Bubba
Herriman, UT,
May 19, 2014

If so many Latter-day Saints pay a tithe, fast offering, and volunteer in their communities, that should be a sign to others that Mormonism *is* as Christian religion. By their fruits ye shall know them.

4. Schnee
Salt Lake City, UT,
May 19, 2014

@samhill
"To someone of her mindset paying a mandatory tax, taken through coercion"

It's not really coercion to the people who support that level of taxation.

5. Copacetic
Logan, UT,
May 19, 2014

@ Schnee:

That is a humorous argument you are trying to make. Paying federal taxes is always a level of coercion. If you are forced to pay or do something, that is being coerced. And yes, we are indeed forced (coerced) to pay our taxes.

Paying them is NOT a voluntary option. It is a requirement mandated by law and subject to financial penalty and/or imprisonment if someone refuses. I can't think of a better example of coercion. You are simply trying to argue semantics rather than principle. And that still doesn't hold any water even at that level.